What is the EPG?

A forum for networking, learning new skills, and above all, having fun!

The Emerging Planners of Georgia (EPG) provides a forum for networking, learning new skills, and above all, having fun. Our meetings will be a combination of social events and technical discussions, taking place in informal settings. We will bring in people who have been involved in planning (both from the public and private sectors) for several years, to interact with EPG members and to provide information geared toward emerging professionals.

The EPG is open to emerging planning professionals and to students. Experienced planners are encouraged to participate as educators and mentors to EPG members. Membership in the EPG is free with a paid APA membership.

Join the EPG

Mission & Goals

EPG members are emerging planning leaders and innovative thinkers. The EPG is open to all planning professionals and to students. Experienced planners are encouraged to participate as educators and mentors to EPG members.

The EPG provides a forum for networking, learning new skills, and above all, having fun. Our meetings will be a combination of social events and technical discussions, taking place in informal settings. We will bring in people who have been involved in planning (both from the public and private sectors) to interact with EPG members and to provide information geared toward emerging professionals.

The Georgia EPG’s mission is to help emerging planners establish social and professional relationships both with their peers and with experienced planning professionals. Through career building programs, social events, and mentoring opportunities, the Georgia EPG will promote the planning profession.

History

In the Spring of 2008, the American Planning Association (APA) made it a top priority to focus on emerging planners and their professional development. A Young Planners Taskforce was commissioned by APA President, Bob Hunter, to investigate the feasibility of an emerging planners program. The Young Planners Taskforce effort culminated with the presentation of a report to the APA Board of Directors at the 2008 national conference in Las Vegas. The Sacramento Valley Section of California formed the first emerging planners group in the Spring of 2008. Their overwhelming success led to nine other states creating their own groups. Georgia is the ninth state to join the movement.

In the Summer of 2009, the Georgia EPG hosted a Kick Off Meeting where 30 planning professionals gathered to share challenges and offer potential opportunities for EPG to assist emerging planners. Since our formation in 2009, Georgia EPG has hosted networking events at the semiannual GPA conferences, educational programs, and socials.